Sites to Debunk Internet Hoaxes

About: Urban Legends
This site includes information about Urban Legends, Netlore (Online Rumors, Hoaxes & Legends) and General Folklore.

BreakTheChain.org:   Stop Junk E-Mail and Misinformation
John R. Ratliff founded BreakTheChain.org in 1999 to attempt to reduce the amount of junk e-mail and misinformation on the Internet by discouraging individuals from sending or forwarding e-mail chain letters. His main mission is to educate people about the shortcomings of e-mail chain letters as a means to distribute information to the masses, as well as to empower all users of the Internet to make informed, logical decisions about the information they distribute via these means.

Hoax-Slayer
The goal of the Hoax-Slayer Website is to help make the Internet a safer, more pleasant and more productive environment by:

  • Debunking email and Internet hoaxes
  • Thwarting Internet scammers
  • Combating spam
  • Educating web users about email and Internet security issues.

Symantec: Threat Explorer
The Threat Explorer is a comprehensive resource for daily, accurate and up-to-date information on the latest threats, risks and vulnerabilities.

Snopes.com:  Urban Legends Reference Pages
This is the granddaddy of all fact-checking sites.

Sophos
Sophos is an antivirus company that keeps a small list of hoaxes and urban legends.  Their focus is more on virus hoaxes.  It is not as complete as a lot of the other sites listed here but a good resource if you want to know if you should open the e-mail that just appeared in your inbox.

TruthOrFiction.com
TruthOrFiction.com is a website where Internet users can quickly and easily get information about eRumors, warnings, offers, requests for help, myths, hoaxes, virus warnings, and humorous or inspirational stories that are circulated by email.

Virus Busters
Let the Virus Busters put you in the know! Share the facts and help stop the spread of false information.

Vmyths
Vmyths traces its roots to a “Computer Virus Myths treatise” first published in 1988. It evolved into the critically acclaimed “Computer Virus Myths home page” in 1995, then it moved to Vmyths.com in 2000. Its name has changed over the years, but Vmyths remains true to its original goal: the eradication of computer security hysteria.

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